Kids Crafts

Kids Craft – Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts

I have this last Halloween post to share with you, before all the Christmas and Winter posts begin!

Here’s how to make some Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts with your kids (or use the same technique to make one for yourself of course!)…

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 1: Gather your supplies – a tee shirt each, some fabric paint and a plate to tip it onto, a paintbrush to stir, a black fabric pen, and some potatoes cut into Halloween shapes. We used a small circle as a spider, a larger circle / oval as a pumpkin, a tall oval with a zig-zag edge as a ghost, and two potatoes cut as bat wings to make a bigger bat:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

You will also need large pieces of card to put inside your tee shirts while you are painting – this stops the paint from seeping through to the back of your tee shirts:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: Protect your work surface if you want to, then spread some black paint onto the plate:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Swirl the potato in the paint to make sure the design is covered in paint, then stamp it onto the tee shirts. Little ones may need help to make sure they use the right pressure when stamping:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: Wash the plate and paintbrush and repeat the stamping with the other designs, using one colour at a time. I had to mix yellow and red to make the orange for the pumpkins, which taught Cheeky Boy about mixing colours too. You won’t be able to see the ghosts on a white tee shirt, but stamp them anyway as we’re going to fix that in the next step:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Do you see the black line at the top of the white tee shirt? That’s where Little Miss dropped her potato and it rolled across the tee shirt. They can be a bit slippery! We decided to pretend it was a spiderweb!

Step 5: Once the paint is dry (we left ours to dry overnight to make sure, but it will depend on your fabric paint), you can then add details with the black fabric pen. Make sure you draw an outline around the ghosts on the white tee shirt:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

We also added the spider’s legs, eyes and mouths on the ghosts and pumpkins, and Little Miss added a speech bubble too, which says ‘we are spooky’. We then also added a couple of white blobs of fabric paint for the spider’s eyes, which we left to dry for a couple of hours before putting a small black dot in the middle of the eye with fabric pen:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Cheeky Boy’s drawings were not as neat, but he was really enjoying himself so I just let him get on with it! I love the lopsided eyes he did, as they do look quite scary:

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Set your fabric paint and pens according to the instructions – if you need to iron it make sure you protect it with a cloth (like a tea towel). Then test your tee shirts out, with some face painting for good measure, and a walk on top of a misty, breezy hill!

Halloween Potato Print Tee Shirts at Jennifer Grace Creates

They were shouting ‘boo’ at anyone who walked past! These tee shirts could obviously be adapted to suit themes at different times of the year – snowmen and Christmas trees in the winter, Easter Eggs in spring etc. I’m sure we’ll be making more as they have loved wearing them!

Well I think we are all ready for Halloween. I will see you again soon to kick off the Christmas & Winter crafting!

Jennifer x

Kids Crafts

Halloween Monsters + Creature Consequences Game!

Hello all. Sorry it’s quiet here lately. As well as my part-time job in the school library and my volunteer work running a Rainbows unit, I am now also the Chair of the very busy PTA at my kids school. So my blogging is running a little behind. I hope I’ll find my groove eventually as my crafting and blogging is my haven from all the madness!

Today I’m sharing a new Try-It-Tribe project that me and the kids made with the help of Staedtler. We were challenged to design some Halloween Monsters, so we played a game of Creature Consequences (I’ll explain in a minute if you don’t know what that is) to come up with some ideas. Then the kids picked their favourites to copy onto white card, and coloured them in for us to stick up on the wall as Halloween decorations this year:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

Cheeky Boy’s is on the left, and Little Miss’ is on the right, in case you can’t tell! I was actually quite impressed with Cheeky Boy’s monster, it’s the first time I’ve seen him concentrate on getting eyes and ears in the right places. I almost tried to explain that monsters could have eyes and ears in the wrong places, but I thought that would totally confuse him at this stage of his drawing development! He did give his monster a wind-powered water canon, so that was creative enough!

So we started our ideas with a game of Creature Consequences. Here are the kids all ready to go. Little Miss was super excited to be playing an ‘art game’:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

I’m going to show you how the game is played – these drawings are all by me as no way would the kids let me take photos during game time, but normally you pass the paper around to another player between each fold.

1: Fold an A4 piece of paper for each player, so that it has 3 folds (four sections of paper). Basically fold it in half, then in half again. Then unfold it. Then, keeping it a secret (you shouldn’t be able to see each other’s drawings), each player draws a head at the top of the paper. You have to make sure the neck crosses the first fold slightly:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

2: Once you’ve finished the head you fold the paper a couple of times, so the head is hidden and all you can see is the little tiny bit of neck which you crossed over into the next section. Then you all pass the piece of paper to the player on your left, and draw a body in the next section, making sure the bottom of the body crosses into the next section:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

3: Repeat the folding and passing of the paper, then draw some legs:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

4: Repeat the folding and passing of the paper, and finish with some feet:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

5: Then the fun bit happens when you unfold the paper and reveal the monster:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

Here’s the monsters we ended up with during our game:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

The kids giggled a lot when they unrolled the monsters!

This is a great game as you can play it with any number of players. You could also use it for developing characters for stories. Or there is a ‘story consequences’ game where you write a boys name, a girls name, what he said, what she said, etc… rather than drawing.

Creature Consequences is great for Little Miss’ age (7) but was a bit hard for Cheeky Boy (age 4). I certainly wouldn’t play it with more than one child of that age. I did have to keep peeking at his to remind him to cross the picture over the line just a little bit. But he really enjoyed it and I know it’s something we will play again!

After the game they all looked at the monsters and chose what bits they’d like to use on a big picture. So I gave them a piece of A3 card each and they got drawing. Here’s Cheeky Boy explaining how the wind-power is going to work on his monster:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

They used a combination of Staedtler pencils and crayons for most of the drawings, then finished off with some touches of gold and silver metallic markers, and Little Miss used a fineliner on hers too:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

I love how unique they are!

I made my own monster too, of course:

Halloween Monsters and a Creature Consequences Game at Jennifer Grace Creates

He’s got gold toenails. I was really impressed with how well the gold metallic marker showed up on top of the purple pencil, these metallic markers are great if you want to draw on top of dark colours!

What do you think of our Halloween Monsters? Have you ever played Creature Consequences or Story Consequences?

I’ll have some more Halloween projects appearing over the next week-or-so! You can also check out the Staedtler Facebook Page or their Blog for more Monster inspiration!

Bye for now, Jennifer x

Disclosure: Staedtler sent us the products to use for this post, but all photos, text, and opinions are our own.

Kids Crafts

Making Alien Toys with Kids Fimo Moulds

Hello!

Recently me and my kids joined in with a Facebook competition on the Staedtler page, to try and be a member of their Try-It team of bloggers. We were excited to win a place on the team, especially when our box of goodies showed up:

Staedtler Try-It Tribe Goodies

Today I’m sharing our first Try-It tribe project – some alien toys using the kids Fimo moulds!

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

Disclosure: Staedtler sent us the products to use for this post, but all photos, text, and opinions are our own.

We had tons of fun making these, and we definitely picked up a few tips for how to use the moulds along the way too! For those that don’t know, Fimo is a modelling clay which you can shape, and then bake it in the oven to make it solid. This is kids Fimo too, which seems to be extra soft – great for making it easier to shape!

First we got all the colours of Fimo and the moulds out to have a look at:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

We chose which colours to use first. When I looked at the packets I was excited because they had a re-sealing closure… or they looked like they should. But actually all the packets just ripped when I opened them, so the re-sealing sticky bit was kind of useless. I ended up wrapping our leftover Fimo in clingfilm so it wouldn’t dry out. All my packets tore down the side like this:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

Top tip #1 – which it did say in the mould instructions – was to spritz the mould with a bit of water before putting the Fimo in, so that it comes out easier. We did try it with and without the water, and it was definitely A LOT easier to get them out if they had water sprayed inside first. I just used a garden water spray:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

I left the kids to do the moulds themselves first to see if they could do it on their own. But their natural inclination was to press the fimo down into the moulds using their fingers – which would mean you wouldn’t get the impression at the back of the mould:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

I then explained that the Fimo needed to be bigger – like a ball for the planet, or like a fat sausage for the aliens, so that you would get a 3D object with shaping at the back and the front:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

They both managed to press the moulds shut themselves – Cheeky Boy liked to press his against his belly:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

When the items came out of the moulds we had to remove the excess Fimo. We did this with a combination of pinching it off or using a modelling tool to cut it off (it didn’t come with a modelling tool, but we happened to have one). Then we smoothed down any bumps that were left over:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

One thing to note is that if you’ve sprayed the mould too much then the Fimo will come out a bit wet and slimy:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

We smoothed it out a bit then left it to dry for 5 mins or so, and it turned out fine.

A lot of the moulds have details that leave impressions on the surface, like eyes and arms on the aliens. However, these details tended to get lost when we were removing the excess Fimo and handling the models – I think this was partly due to the kids Fimo being that bit softer – it was easy to accidentally smooth the details out!

It was okay because it gave us a reason to use more colours and add our own details. Cheeky boy seemed to be especially good at this, he loved adding eyes, spots, feet, and stripes:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

I should also point out that we used baby wipes to clean our hands in between colours. After making a red planet Little Miss had to go and wash her hands as her hands were so red! It came off easily enough though.

The only mould that we had a lot of problems with was the stars mould – we couldn’t seem to get the excess Fimo off without losing the shape of the stars. This was our first attempt:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

And our second attempt – I did the larger star on the left by myself which is why it’s the neatest:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

Then of course Cheeky Boy decided my neat star needed some ‘spots’ and he proceeded to cover it in black Fimo blobs. Ah well, he was happy:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

Once they were finished moulding I baked the aliens and accessories in the oven following the packet instructions, and left them to cool before the kids had a chance to play:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

Here’s a little 30 second video of them playing with their new toys:

I don’t think Fimo is really designed to make toys – I know that pieces may eventually break or fall off. But as there aren’t any thin or fiddly bits on these they should last a while. The kids have been bashing them around in their games for a few days now and nothing’s broken yet!

Little Miss calls them her ‘miniaturisers’… which she thought meant that even though they were little they could do big things. She also likes the idea that they can turn things tiny, now that I’ve explained it! See, we are learning as well.

I was really happy with how much the kids enjoyed making these, and I was surprised by how much Cheeky Boy (who turned 4 a few months ago) could do by himself. We can’t wait to try our next Staedtler project! For more from Staedtler check out their blog HERE.

Of course I couldn’t let the kids have all the fun… here’s my alien:

Making Alien Toys With Kids Fimo Moulds at Jennifer Grace Creates

I think the kid’s ones are better, but I like my little alien too!

Have you ever tried using Fimo or modelling clay? I used to make earrings with it too so I might get Little Miss to make some jewellery next.

I’m linking this up to the Tuesday Pintorials Linky Party!

Bye for now,

Jennifer x

Disclosure: Staedtler sent us the products to use for this post, but all photos, text, and opinions are our own.

Kids Crafts

Craft Stick Puzzles – A Rainy Day Kids Activity

We had quite a lot of rainy days this summer holidays. Most of the time we still got out and about, but we had a few indoor days where I found some activities to entertain the kids! I spotted THIS VERSION on Pinterest, and we adapted it to our styles!

Craft Stick Puzzles:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity

I wasn’t sure whether to call these popsicle stick puzzles, or lolly stick puzzles, or craft stick puzzles. What do you call them?!

We started with a roll of pencils, some craft sticks, paper, and a pen:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

You will also need a glue stick, a craft guillotine / scissors, a ruler, a pencil.

Step 1: Choose how many craft sicks you want to use by laying them side by side – we used 14:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: Measure a piece of paper to fit the front of the sticks:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Draw a picture onto the paper. I gave my kids a piece each and didn’t give much instruction – I just said it would look good if the colour went up to the edges of the paper:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: Little Miss (age 7) drew a space picture, and Cheeky Boy (age 4) drew a lot of scribbles which he says is a spaceship:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 5: Cut the paper up into pieces that will fit onto your craft sticks. I measured them with a ruler and pencil, then cut them with a craft guillotine. Another way to do it is to stick the whole piece of paper across the sticks, then use a craft knife to cut between the sticks – I couldn’t find a sharp craft knife so I went for this method instead:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Glue on the back of each piece of paper then adhere it to a craft stick. Cheeky Boy needed some help to make sure he put enough glue on the paper:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Little Miss was able to do hers by herself:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 7: Once the pieces are all stuck on you can put the sticks back in order. This took a while to work out with Cheeky Boy’s as it was a complicated scribble:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

So we added numbers to his sticks to make it easier to find the right order again – it helps him with number recognition / counting as well. I wrote the numbers along the tops of the sticks, and he had a go at writing them at the bottom:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

Then the puzzles were finished! They had great fun trying them out, and have showed them to their friends since too. I’d love to try this again in a couple of years to see how their drawing styles have changed:

Craft Stick Puzzles - A Rainy Day Kids Activity at Jennifer Grace Creates

I might make one for myself too!

Do you or your kids like puzzles? I love them and Little Miss likes them as long as they aren’t too hard. Cheeky Boy is normally not interested in them – he’d rather build stuff with bricks!

Bye for now,

Jennifer x

P.S. I’m linking this up to the Tuesday Pintorials linky party!

Kids Crafts

Kids Craft – Crayons + Watercolours!

As my children are on their Easter break from school I thought we ought to do a kids craft activity. Every day they get a little crafty with their felt pens and stickers, but when they get to use Mummy’s paint’s that’s a real treat. I decided to show them what happens when you use crayons (you could also use oil pastels) and watercolours!

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

When you draw a picture with wax crayons and then paint over the top with watercolours the crayon resists the paint so you can still see the pattern through. This is like magic for kids (and I find it quite fun too).

We started with a box of crayons and Mummy’s watercolour paints to share, plus a palette, water pot, paintbrushes, and white card each. They had two scraps of white card to try the techniques out on first, then a big A3 sheet of card each for a bigger picture:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

This card is nothing fancy, just cheap white card. It will buckle after painting but will flatten out quite a bit if you stick it underneath something heavy once it’s dry!

They started on the scraps first, but you can’t tell my daughter to hurry for a practice piece, she wanted a perfect picture even on the small scrap. Cheeky Boy can’t do much except scribble and draw crosses / kisses:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

Once they’ve drawn some marks with crayon it’s time to start painting. I showed them both how to use the watercolours and Little Miss managed on her own, but I did have to help my son get the consistency right for the paint – he kept doing it too dry so it wouldn’t spread, or too watery so it had hardly any colour. Once I helped him mix it he went crazy with the painting though:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

He was smiling the whole time:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

Little Miss had her concentrating face on though! This was when she’d moved onto her second scrap of card, where I’d encouraged her to scribble – she’d basically coloured in the flowers on the first scrap and not really tried out the resist effect of the crayons. So she tried it out here with white crayon as the resist:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

Cheeky Boy moved onto his big piece of card and made lots of lovely swirls and marks with the crayon. At this point he was most interested in what colours we could make by mixing different hues together. Thumbs up for making purple:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

Little Miss moved onto her big piece of card, but she was mostly colouring again. When she was using the resist she was painting along the crayon marks by following the lines rather than swooshing the paint across:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

When she said she’d finished I showed her that she could put a lot of water onto the brush to swipe across the picture – to make the colours blend a bit more and fill up the white gaps for her page which she had fun with.

Here are their finished pictures:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

This was a really easy activity that they were both able to try despite the age differences (they are 3 and 7 years old). It kept my daughter interested for longer but my son maybe had more fun as he was in his element making a mess! I had to keep reminding myself not to worry if they weren’t doing things how I expected – it’s more important for them to experiment and have fun, right?!

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

I’m thinking this was an introductory session and I will have a go again with more of a project in mind – maybe lots of squares with different patterns on to make a collage. There’s some more ideas for how to use this technique by other bloggers HERE, HERE, and HERE.

In the meantime I will experiment on my own too – here’s my quick attempt:

Kids Craft - Watercolours + Crayons at Jennifer Grace Creates

I did use this technique on a layout a few years ago (called Funny Faces – HERE), and now I’ve reminded myself about it I think I’ll be using it more often!

If you want more ways to use watercolours make sure you come back on Thursday (the 9th of April) when I’ll be sharing a process video for a watercolour card.

See you soon,

Jennifer x

P.S. I’m linking this up to the Tuesday Tutorials #pintorials Linky Party!

DIY Gifts

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids

Looking for an alternative to chocolate eggs to gift to kids this Easter? Put together an Easter crafting kit for them instead!

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

I’ve been pinning to my Easter DIY Crafts and Recipes Board, and while searching for Easter crafts I found a few altered egg-box ideas, including THIS ONE turned into a sewing kit, THIS ONE with sweet treats inside, and THIS ONE with toy animals. As I wanted to make one for my daughter, and she is greatly into crafting (I wonder where she gets that from?) I decided to turn mine into an Easter crafting kit.

To make one of your own…

Step 1: Start with an egg-box:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: Paint the inside with craft paint (I used Martha Stewart’s Beach Glass Satin Paint):

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Then paint the outside (you can do this while the inside is still drying):

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: On any areas where there was printed detail on the egg-box, paint another coat or two of paint until it’s no longer visible.

Step 5: Once the paint is all dry, stick some glue-dots over the top and sides of the lid:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Shake some glitter over the glue-dots, pressing it down to make sure it gets good and stuck, then tip off the excess (I used American Crafts ‘Tangerine’ Fine Glitter):

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 7: Fix any broken areas of the egg-box – the tip of the latch on mine had broken off:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

So I covered it up by sticking a flower-shaped button on with Glossy Accents:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

The outside of the box is now looking very cute:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 8: Gather the contents you are gifting in your box. I bought some ribbon, coloured chicks, stickers, and wooden egg decorations from Hobbycraft:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 9: Download and print off the ‘Your Easter Crafting Kit’ free printable HERE (it prints the image in two different colours, tangerine and aqua). Stick it into the inside of the egg-box lid, then fill the box with the crafty goodies:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

If you are using stickers inside you’ll need to cut them out so they fit in the carton – make sure you round the edges as you cut rather than leaving sharp corners:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 10: Once you’ve filled the box, place some tissue paper on top of the contents (so they don’t shake and get all mixed up), then tie a piece of ribbon around the box to finish it off:

Painted Egg-Box DIY Easter Gift For Kids - No Chocolate! At Jennifer Grace Creates

Gift it to a crafty kid this Easter! Now I just need to make one for my son too, I need to find some cars or something to put inside!

I’ve been busy with lots of Easter crafting, so I’ll show you some more soon.

Have a great day,

Jennifer x

P.S. I’m linking this up to the Tatertots & Jello Palooza and Diana Rambles Pin Me Linky Parties.

Kids Crafts

Making A Waste Wizard – Kids Craft

Lately I’ve been spending a lot of crafty time with the kids. Here’s one of our latest projects, which Little Miss wanted to make for a local competition…

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

It was a fun project using recyclable items and crafty stuff we already had, so I’m sharing it as it can be something to turn to when the kids are bored!

Here’s the leaflet we received about the competition:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

Basically you had to use recyclable items as the base for your project, and then you could add crafty stuff like paint and glitter on top.

We gathered together lots of bits that would normally go in our recycling bin:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

And Little Miss rifled through for inspiration. I am always determined to let my kids steer their projects rather than suggesting / guiding them too much – they always come up with things I would never think of!

Once she’d chosen a few bits she started building the body together using sticky tape (I sat beside her and kept passing her bits of tape):

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

We had to make sure the wizard stayed under 40cm tall per the competition rules.

He has an empty salsa pot and a soap bottle as the body, egg box arms (with a bit of newspaper padding) and a toilet inner cylinder as the head:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

Now Little Miss came out with one of those unexpected gems… she wanted the wizard to rattle. You have to pick the wizard up and say ‘abracadabra’, give him a shake, then you can hear the magic happening!

She found these milk bottle tops to make the rattling noise and taped them inside the salsa pot:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

She also chose a plastic cup for a hat. Then she started coating the hat and body (inc all the sticky tape) with newspaper and glue:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

I helped out a bit with the paper-mache as it takes a while!

We left the wizard to dry overnight at this point. Then the next morning it was time to paint it all. Cheeky boy wanted to join in at this point so I gave him some paper and let him go crazy experimenting with the paint:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

Here’s what the parts looked like when painted:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

Finally the wizard needed some finishing touches. The facial features were drawn with permanent markers. He had to have recycling symbols on somewhere so Little Miss stuck one on his hat and one on each armpit! I don’t think she was aiming for armpits but that’s what it looked like to me – I smiled and didn’t comment. She also made hair and eyebrows from newspaper, a wand out of cardboard, a beard out of an envelope (the printed inside), and a tie out of a ring-pull:

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

She added some glitter to the base of his cloak and to the top of his hat, then he was all finished (Cheeky Boy photo-bombed this picture, but they looked so cute I had to use it):

Making A Waste Wizard Kids Craft at Jennifer Grace Creates

The added fun with the glitter is that when you shake the wizard to hear him rattle you also shower magical glitter everywhere! Didn’t think about that but it seems appropriate.

There are so many ways to adapt the wizard / witch, I’ve seen a wizard with an owl perched on his head, a witch wearing recycled jewellery, and another wizard with a see-through body!

With this project, my birthday card using recycled items, and an activity making junk creatures at Rainbows, I’m all recycled out right now! Which is okay, because I just received some new-to-me scrappy items I bought in a sale, so I’m itching to use them. Time to break open the box.

Have a great day,

Jennifer x