Frosty Festivities Christmas & Winter, Giftwrapping

Embroidered Christmas Tags

(This post is part of my Frosty Festivities 2015 Blog Event – see a list of all the posts HERE)

Yesterday I posted a giveaway from the Little Dorrit & Co Etsy Shop who sell beautiful PDF embroidery patterns – you can see that giveaway HERE {NOW CLOSED}. Today I’m back to show you how I used The Gingerbread Man PDF pattern which I purchased from them! I decided to stitch just some of the details onto a couple of Embroidered Christmas Tags…

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

They are all ready fo an extra special present, or to be stuck on a card or scrapbook page!

To make some tags of your own…

Step 1: Print off an embroidery template and cut out the pieces you want to use, making sure they fit on your tags:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: If the tag is light or thin enough, then you can tape the pattern to a window, and trace the design onto the tag:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

If the tag is light or thin enough then just tape the pattern on top of the tag:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Pierce holes along the lines of a traced image:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Or if the image is stuck on top of the tag just pierce the holes along the lines, going through the paper and the tag at the same time:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

You can draw pencil lines to connect the holes if you need to make it clearer where the stitching should go – I drew lines along the tinsel of the trees so I didn’t get confused between that and the baubles:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: Use embroidery thread to sew back-stitches and french knots along the designs (I used 2 strands of embroidery thread on all):

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 5: The backs of the tags will look a little messy:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

So if the people might see the back of the tags (if you are not sticking them flat onto a project) then cover the messy backs with patterned paper:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Finish the tags off with some bling if you want to, I used liquid pearls to make some snowy dots:

Embroidered Christmas Tags at Jennifer Grace Creates

Anyone who receives these will know you spent some time making them a special tag!

Be Inspired:

Use an embroidery pattern or printable icon to add stitching to a project

Find or make a gingerbread man embellishment to craft with

Create some snow with liquid pearls, sequins, gems, or enamel dots

Do you think you’d stick these tags on a present or keep them for a special scrapbook layout?

Remember that commenting on this post, and any post that goes live during November 2015, will count as another entry into the Grand Giveaway {NOW CLOSED}, but only if you’ve registered your interest in winning that prize right HERE!

I’ll be back tomorrow at 2pm GMT for the frosty festivities 2015 blog hop!

Jennifer x

Home Decor Craft Projects

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame)

Today I’m sharing a cute home decor project. This DIY embroidery hoop has colours and a photo that are perfect for spring and Easter, but you could adapt them to suit any time of year!

Read on for details on how to put one together, and for a free printable pattern for the frame…

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

I was inspired to make this by one of the classes at Big Picture Classes (see my review of their new website HERE) – there’s a class called Made With Love by Meghan Hoeppner which is about making beautiful gifts. One of the lessons is to fill embroidery hoops. Mine didn’t turn out anything like Meghan’s but that’s where my inspiration sprang from!

Here’s how to make your own…

Step 1: First print off this free pattern HERE (you’ll be prompted to download), which will give you a template for the embroidered frame. You are welcome to use this for personal AND professional use, just please credit me where you can:

Frame Embroidery Pattern Free Printable at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: Print the pattern off (onto transfer paper if you’re using that), and find an embroidery hoop (mine is an 8″ hoop) and a piece of linen or other fabric to embroider onto:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Use your preferred method to transfer the pattern to your material (HERE are a few ways to transfer the design). I taped my pattern, and then my fabric, onto a window to trace it:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

You can use a sharp pencil to draw the design onto the linen:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: Undo your embroidery hoop, put your material with the design on inside, and close it up again to pull the material taut. Find some embroidery threads to use with your design:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 5: Find something relaxing to listen to or watch while you embroider!

I stitched all my lines with a simple backstitch, as that’s about the extent of my embroidering ability, but if you can do anything fancier, go for it! One thing to note is that you need quite small stitches on the hearts, so that when you go around the curves they look smooth:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Finish off the back of the embroidery hoop. If you are giving it as a gift, selling it, or just really want it to last forever, then THIS is an excellent way to finish the hoop off. But I hadn’t left myself a big enough margin of material to do this, and as I’m keeping it myself I just went for the trimming-off-the-excess-material method.

This isn’t advised as it makes it impossible to take out the material and wash it, or just re-stretch it if it starts to go saggy, and if the material starts to fray it may fray round to the edge of the hoop. I tried to at least fend off this last problem by sealing the edges of the material with a little PVA glue:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 7: Create some words to stick onto your design -you could use alpha stickers or die-cut words. I used my Cricut Explore to create the words ‘just wandering’, using the Chalkboard Fonts – Condensed font for ‘just’, and the Songbird font for ‘wandering’ (for this word I also moved the letters closer together and then welded them):

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

When they were cut from pink and teal papers they were so small and delicate:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

So I used my Xyron 150 to cover the backs with adhesive:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 8: Stick these, and your photo, onto your hoop design (I used double-sided tape all over the back of my photo to adhere it). I placed all the items gently onto the front, then flipped the hoop over to press down from the back to make sure they were nicely stuck:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 9: Add any finishing touches. I decided it needed one little extra at the top left, to balance out where the word ‘wandering’ is longer at the bottom right. So I added a flower-shaped brad from my stash:

DIY Embroidery Hoop With A Photo (including a free pattern for the frame) at Jennifer Grace Creates

That’s it, you’ve made something pretty!

Have you ever tried embroidery? I feel like I want to try lots more now… I might start adding to some clothes belonging to Little Miss!

I’m including this post in the Creative Mondays Blog Hop Linky Party.

Have a great day,

Jennifer x

DISCLOSURE: Cricut have provided me with a Cricut Explore Machine, some materials, and access to the Image Library, which helped me write this post. However ALL opinions in this post are my own and not governed or controlled by Cricut in any way.

P.S. I’m linking this up to the Tatertots & Jello Palooza and Diana Rambles Pin Me Linky Parties.

Frosty Festivities Christmas & Winter

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial

(This post is part of my Frosty Festivities 2014 Blog Event – see the beginning HERE!)

Here’s a sewing project to keep you warm this winter…

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Do you remember my Winter Woollies Recycling Post about cutting up a jumper-dress, from FF2012? And then my Woolly Winter Wreath Post from FF2013, using up the same material?

I wanted to see if I could get another project out of the material I had left:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Here’s how to put the scarf together…

Step 1: Cut a piece of stretch-woollen fabric to approx 19 x 24″. Mine has a curve in it because I followed the dress shape – I cut either side of the existing seams so I didn’t have to worry about the material unravelling:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

If you don’t have existing seam like this you’ll need to finish your edges with a zig-zag stitch, or a fray-stop glue.

Step 2: Fold the material in half along the long centre line, with the right-sides facing each other. Pin together so the seams meet along the top, and sew them together:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Turn it the right way out again. Pin the short ends together and sew a zig-zag stitch along them to stop the material fraying. This gave my scarf a ruffled edge:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

It looked quite pretty, so if my material had been long enough I could have left it like that. Unfortunately it was only 9 x 23″, which doesn’t make a very long scarf:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 4: To elongate your scarf, cut four 12 x 12″ squares of material, two each of contrasting colours:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 5: Sew a zig-zag stitch all around the outside borders of these, to stop it fraying (or use a fray-stop glue):

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Sew the floral squares 6″ down on the geometric squares, so the floral bit is at the back of the geometric bit:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 7: Sew a loose running stitch along the top edge of the geometric material, and gather it, so the top edge of this is the same length as the end of the woollen scarf piece:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 8: Sew the geometric pieces to both ends of the woollen piece. Then your scarf is finished:

Contrasting Layers Scarf Tutorial at Jennifer Grace Creates

Wear it on winter days!

Be Inspired:

Use contrasting patterns next to each other (eg geometric and floral)

Ruffle something up

Make a project longer, eg create a double-page layout or make a card taller with an add-on piece

Do you have a selection of long scarves to keep you warm in the winter?

I’ll see you again in 60 minutes!

Jennifer x

Home Decor Craft Projects

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (or toy!)

(This post is part of my Frosty Festivities 2014 Blog Event – see the beginning HERE!)

Here’s a cute gift to make this Christmas – a felt Santa (Father Christmas) / Gnome! Read on for a tutorial and templates!

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

I’ve made this to give to my Nanna, she has some heavy doors in her house so she always appreciates a good doorstop. He’s about 10.5 inches tall by 4.5 inches wide at the base. I used blue for Santa’s coat (main body piece and arms) so that he could be mistaken for a garden gnome – in case she wants to have it on display all year round. But if you want it super festive you could give him a red coat.

It doesn’t have to be a doorstop either – you could also make this just for a room decoration, or as a toy for a child if you leave out the weighty insides and just fill it with stuffing. Oh the possibilities!

Want to make one? I’ve made some templates for you. You can download them at A4 size (page 1 HERE, page 2 HERE) or at Letter size (page 1 HERE, page 2 HERE) – clicking the link will prompt you to download the png file.

Templates for a Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

And here’s how to put it together…

Step 1: Gather your felt (I didn’t end up using the dark grey piece. My felt is from Handmade Haven), and print and cut out the template pieces:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 2: Use the templates to cut out the right amount of felt pieces. I pinned on the larger templates to cut around, and for the smaller templates I drew around them with haberdasher’s chalk before cutting the felt:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Here’s the pieces of felt all cut out – I used light grey for the circle for my base, I would have preferred light blue to match his coat but I didn’t have enough:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 3: Check the placement of the face piece by laying the beard and hat on top – they will line up with the edges of the main body, so you can check the face is centred. Pin the face in place and sew it on, then sew the beard on top, finishing with the hat and moustache:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 5: Sew the hat onto the back body piece, then add any other decorations you want to the main body pieces. I stitched on a belt of layered red and gold ribbon, with a black button for a buckle, sewed a few gold seed beads onto the hat, and used two small gun-metal coloured brads for the eyes.

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

NB: If you are giving this as a toy to a small child make sure you don’t add buttons, brads, or beads – or anything that could be pulled off a swallowed.

Step 5: Place two arm pieces together and stitch around two sides and the ‘hand’ end, leaving the body end open. Turn the arms inside out, then stuff lightly with toy filling (do not fill too much, you only want a little depth, and don’t fill above the ‘elbow’ height):

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 6: Put two sleeve pieces together and sew down each long edge, leaving the top and bottom open. Push your arms through the sleeves – mine were a bit tight so I’ve increased the sleeve width on the template to make this step easier for you:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 7: Sew a couple of quick (tacking) stitches to hold the arms in place on each side of the body – they will fold outwards so make sure they fold the way you want them to:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 8: Pin the two main body pieces together, so the right-sides are facing each other, and the arms are tucked inwards:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 9: Sew down the two long sides. I used my sewing machine for the thinner areas, and hand-stitched a back-stitch across the arm areas, as there was no-way my sewing machine would get through that many layers of felt:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 10: Fold the circle felt piece in half, and pin it so the two corners you’ve created are pinned to the bottom edges of Santa’s body:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 11: Sew most of the circle onto the base, pinching the circle to gather it occasionally, otherwise you’ll run out of space for the whole circle. Leave a hole a few inches wide so that you can turn Santa the right way out again:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 12: Once he’s the right way out use some more toy stuffing to fill his top half – down roughly the arm height. If you are making this for a toy, and leaving out the weighty fillings, you can use toy stuffing all the way down.

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 13: Add the weighty fillings. To weigh the doorstop down you can fill it with a variety of things like sand, dried beans, or gravel. I’ve used a combination of rice and pebbles. If you’re using something edible (eg. might attract critters to eat it) then make sure you bag it up. I tucked a couple of sturdy sandwich bags (one inside the other) into Santa, then filled it my folding a piece of paper in half and using it to tip the rice in:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

When it was nearly full of rice I tucked four pebbles inside too – my Nanna’s doors are too heavy for rice alone:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 15: Tape up the bags with strong tape:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 16: Tuck in any extra toy stuffing that you think Santa needs, then sew the hole closed using an invisible seam stitch (HERE is a good tutorial for one by Fern Freckle).

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

Step 17: If you want to you could add a little pom-pom to Santa’s hat:

Charming Felt Santa / Gnome Doorstop (Or Toy!) by Jennifer Grace Creates

He’s finished! Gift him or place him in a doorway – and smile each time you walk by!

Be Inspired:

Use felt to make a gift, decoration, or embellishment

Create a Santa with a coat that’s NOT red (eg. use stamps, die-cut machines, or hand-cut paper)

Use brads, buttons, and beads on your next project

Would you make this Santa with a red coat or blue? Would he be a doorstop or a toy?

Thanks so much for reading, don’t forget to bookmark, pin, or share this post if you enjoyed it!

See you again in an hour for the first sponsored giveaway!

P.S. I’m linking this up to the Snap Show & Tell Linky!

Jennifer x

Scrapbook Layouts

Stitching on Paper – inc. a free Template!

Hello! I’m back from the magical Disneyland Paris. More on that tomorrow for 10 things on the Tenth!
In the meantime I’m behind on a couple of posts. One is the new Scrapbooking Soiree for August – I’ll have a post for that up sometime tonight or tomorrow morning (including the prize winner from last month!).
The other post is this one, which I really meant to schedule for while I was away, but packing for four people (yes, hubby really can’t pack for himself) sent me scatterbrained, and I didn’t manage to sort it out. 
I wanted to show you a couple of details from my projects for Stitching on Paper – a free online class being run at the moment by the lovely Clair of Obstinate Pursuit. If you haven’t seen her classes from last weekend, then check them out. You can see two layouts from me included as class examples!
The first layout of mine, for the hand stitching class, features this cute cloud:

Which I backstitched with doubled embroidery thread (two threads the same colour together), so that it stood out on the page. The holes were all pierced with a paper piercer first to make it easier! 
If you’d like to recreate this little cloud on a project of your own, you can download the jpeg here, and print it out to A4 size to get it the same dimensions as my cloud. Or, if you prefer, you can right-click and save the below picture, and re-size it as you wish:

Isn’t he a happy little cloud?!
My second layout for the class features machine stitching – both zig-zag and straight stitching:

I got the idea to use different colours of thread for the journaling lines from the ‘Kisses’ layout by Paige Evans on this post. I used invisible thread for the bobbin so that I only had to change the top thread between each journaling line, which made it a lot faster! 
If you want to see my full layouts, and the other class examples (which are fabulous!), then you’ll need to check out the lessons. Lesson One is ‘Inspired to Stitch by Hand’, and Lesson Two is ‘Inspired to Stitch by Machine’.  

Do you stitch on your paper projects? I hope you will try now if you haven’t before! Anyone who joins in with the class, and links up to the Introduction Post, is in with a chance to win this great prize:

So why not have a go?! See you again soon, x